timeripple: (anenome)
Is it almost Halloween already? Good grief. I had a lovely birthday a few weeks back, complete with the traditional pizza and then dark hot chocolate from Burdick’s (two years in a row makes it a tradition, okay). Turning twenty-five feels like a big deal, somehow; by our arbitrary human calculations, it’s a fairly significant number. Twenty-five is time to be a grown-up: a young grown-up, but a grown-up nonetheless. There’s this one part in one of the Mary Poppins books, when they’re having the tea party on the ceiling with Uncle Albert(?), and they have to think of something sad in order to get back down. Somebody suggests that growing up is sad, and Jane pictures herself, all grown up and carrying a handbag, and finds it exciting rather than sad. At the time, I couldn’t even imagine being twenty-five. I was sure it would never happen to me.

Hah. But “grown-up” is kind of a sad word, though. Having grown up. Growing as a finished action. Well, screw that. It’s okay to let go of some parts of childhood, to be finished with them. Certain other parts, I’ve decided, it’s okay to keep. And I don’t have to stop growing. Especially not when I love so many things, and have so much still to learn and to do.

Especially not right before Halloween, which (as all should know) is a time of old magics, and new ones.

The big question is, will wearing my atrocious homemade plaid trousers on Halloween make me more recognizable as Professor McGonnagall, or less?

***

I know I promised a post on evolutionary biology in some new children’s books, and that will happen, but it’s been put on the back burner for now. (Especially since Robin McKinley’s Pegasus comes out in a few days, and some of you will probably want to read it first.) But mostly this is because I’ve finally gotten some (not very helpful) feedback on a Thing, which if it’s going to actually be a Thing, needs some serious work.

I really, really don’t want to work on it any more. But I think I have to.

If only people were a little clearer on what “in a timely fashion” means. XD
timeripple: (anenome)
Is it almost Halloween already? Good grief. I had a lovely birthday a few weeks back, complete with the traditional pizza and then dark hot chocolate from Burdick’s (two years in a row makes it a tradition, okay). Turning twenty-five feels like a big deal, somehow; by our arbitrary human calculations, it’s a fairly significant number. Twenty-five is time to be a grown-up: a young grown-up, but a grown-up nonetheless. There’s this one part in one of the Mary Poppins books, when they’re having the tea party on the ceiling with Uncle Albert(?), and they have to think of something sad in order to get back down. Somebody suggests that growing up is sad, and Jane pictures herself, all grown up and carrying a handbag, and finds it exciting rather than sad. At the time, I couldn’t even imagine being twenty-five. I was sure it would never happen to me.

Hah. But “grown-up” is kind of a sad word, though. Having grown up. Growing as a finished action. Well, screw that. It’s okay to let go of some parts of childhood, to be finished with them. Certain other parts, I’ve decided, it’s okay to keep. And I don’t have to stop growing. Especially not when I love so many things, and have so much still to learn and to do.

Especially not right before Halloween, which (as all should know) is a time of old magics, and new ones.

The big question is, will wearing my atrocious homemade plaid trousers on Halloween make me more recognizable as Professor McGonnagall, or less?

***

I know I promised a post on evolutionary biology in some new children’s books, and that will happen, but it’s been put on the back burner for now. (Especially since Robin McKinley’s Pegasus comes out in a few days, and some of you will probably want to read it first.) But mostly this is because I’ve finally gotten some (not very helpful) feedback on a Thing, which if it’s going to actually be a Thing, needs some serious work.

I really, really don’t want to work on it any more. But I think I have to.

If only people were a little clearer on what “in a timely fashion” means. XD
timeripple: (i said nothing)
I am so tired. I had a day off yesterday, but had been called in for overtime on Monday and apparently I'm not totally recovered yet. Today was really, really busy. It was the kind of day where I didn’t really have to wrack my brains to find the right books for the right people, but enough people came in asking about children’s books that I kind of felt like hey, I actually do know my stuff. So that was kind of nice.

The building fire alarm did go off around 11, adding a little spice to the morning of extreme business. We stood around outside in the pleasantly nippy street. Some people had dressed up just because they felt like it, and the guys were being super cute about lending suit jackets to ladies in dressy short sleeves. It was adorable. (I, of course, was sensibly clothed.) The fire dudes took their sweet time getting there, kind of wandered around a while, then trooped into the historic burger place next door. They trooped out a few minutes later, turned off the alarm, and went home.

I hope they got some fries, 'cause we sure didn't.

All in all it was a good thing I'd gotten chai beforehand.

Currently reading: Datlow & Windling vampire anthology, due out next April (I am so tired of hip young anthologies. It's not that the stories are bad, but that short story anthologies wear me out because they never seem to end and I almost never have time to get attached to any of the characters). Also Tokyo Vice: An American Reporter on the Police Beat in Japan (uh, just because. No, actually because all Japanese police dramas are actually about how the police are corrupt, and those that aren’t corrupt are underfunded, and I'm in Joker withdrawal *sob*, so it looked interesting).

I had subscribed to the Unshelved Comics feed, because usually I like their comics (obviously), but I defriended them this morning because I didn't feel like dealing with my reaction to today's comic. Seriously, guys? Seriously? I understand that you're being funny, but that's hitting a little too close to home for me.

Leave it to me to pick the literary field that gets the least respect (well, one of them). This is something I'm going to have to deal with, though, and articulate. Soon. The idea that a professional interest in children's books does not make me infantile, or stuck in my own childhood, or otherwise nonfunctional as an intelligent adult. Because I get that a lot, and I'm going to have to have a response. (Other than Um, I read your precious Plato in Greek, and you know what? I gave him up for those "kiddie books." Suck on that!)

Speaking of things I need to articulate, I'm starting once again to think about that evolutionary-biology-in-children’s-sff rant I promised back in August. Don’t feel like looking up all the things I need to look up right now, though. Sleepy. Utterly burned out, and will save the rant research for another day, because I really don’t want to get my homologous structures mixed up with my analogous ones, you know?

Signing off. Good night!
timeripple: (i said nothing)
I am so tired. I had a day off yesterday, but had been called in for overtime on Monday and apparently I'm not totally recovered yet. Today was really, really busy. It was the kind of day where I didn’t really have to wrack my brains to find the right books for the right people, but enough people came in asking about children’s books that I kind of felt like hey, I actually do know my stuff. So that was kind of nice.

The building fire alarm did go off around 11, adding a little spice to the morning of extreme business. We stood around outside in the pleasantly nippy street. Some people had dressed up just because they felt like it, and the guys were being super cute about lending suit jackets to ladies in dressy short sleeves. It was adorable. (I, of course, was sensibly clothed.) The fire dudes took their sweet time getting there, kind of wandered around a while, then trooped into the historic burger place next door. They trooped out a few minutes later, turned off the alarm, and went home.

I hope they got some fries, 'cause we sure didn't.

All in all it was a good thing I'd gotten chai beforehand.

Currently reading: Datlow & Windling vampire anthology, due out next April (I am so tired of hip young anthologies. It's not that the stories are bad, but that short story anthologies wear me out because they never seem to end and I almost never have time to get attached to any of the characters). Also Tokyo Vice: An American Reporter on the Police Beat in Japan (uh, just because. No, actually because all Japanese police dramas are actually about how the police are corrupt, and those that aren’t corrupt are underfunded, and I'm in Joker withdrawal *sob*, so it looked interesting).

I had subscribed to the Unshelved Comics feed, because usually I like their comics (obviously), but I defriended them this morning because I didn't feel like dealing with my reaction to today's comic. Seriously, guys? Seriously? I understand that you're being funny, but that's hitting a little too close to home for me.

Leave it to me to pick the literary field that gets the least respect (well, one of them). This is something I'm going to have to deal with, though, and articulate. Soon. The idea that a professional interest in children's books does not make me infantile, or stuck in my own childhood, or otherwise nonfunctional as an intelligent adult. Because I get that a lot, and I'm going to have to have a response. (Other than Um, I read your precious Plato in Greek, and you know what? I gave him up for those "kiddie books." Suck on that!)

Speaking of things I need to articulate, I'm starting once again to think about that evolutionary-biology-in-children’s-sff rant I promised back in August. Don’t feel like looking up all the things I need to look up right now, though. Sleepy. Utterly burned out, and will save the rant research for another day, because I really don’t want to get my homologous structures mixed up with my analogous ones, you know?

Signing off. Good night!
timeripple: (i said nothing)
Well well well, once again I have totally failed to post anything in almost two weeks. I've been kind of worn out by work and the weather and things. Last week I met up with some dear friends for a picnic followed by Shakespeare on the Common's production of Othello, which was mostly very good except when it was unintentionally funny. I found Iago a lot cooler than in previous productions. I am tempted to blame this, like so many other things, on kdramas. Or jdramas.

Speaking of things with infuriatingly vague endings, how about that Veronica Mars series finale, eh? I finally finished season 3 and was left gaping. What kind of an ending is that? (P.S. Oh Logan, what are we going to do with you?)

I've been doing a lot of reading lately--Robin McKinley's forthcoming book, Tony DiTerlizzi's novel, and so forth. And what I feel building up in my brain is a rant on evolutionary biology, comma, textual misuse of. Anybody interested?
timeripple: (i said nothing)
Well well well, once again I have totally failed to post anything in almost two weeks. I've been kind of worn out by work and the weather and things. Last week I met up with some dear friends for a picnic followed by Shakespeare on the Common's production of Othello, which was mostly very good except when it was unintentionally funny. I found Iago a lot cooler than in previous productions. I am tempted to blame this, like so many other things, on kdramas. Or jdramas.

Speaking of things with infuriatingly vague endings, how about that Veronica Mars series finale, eh? I finally finished season 3 and was left gaping. What kind of an ending is that? (P.S. Oh Logan, what are we going to do with you?)

I've been doing a lot of reading lately--Robin McKinley's forthcoming book, Tony DiTerlizzi's novel, and so forth. And what I feel building up in my brain is a rant on evolutionary biology, comma, textual misuse of. Anybody interested?
timeripple: (intellectual dilettante)
Orthros no Inu is over, and so are my recaps. I’ll miss the weekly woobiefest, but everybody else can heave a sigh of relief.

Last week in SFF class I found myself, once again, in the position of defending science. We had read Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH (O’Brian), Double Helix (Werlin), and The House of the Scorpion (Farmer) for that week. We got to talking about how in House of the Scorpion the evildoers are the people who use the products of science rather than the people who do the science, whereas in Double Helix the main scientist is EVIL EVIL EVIL. The main EVIL EVIL GOT IT YET? EVILLLL scientist talks about how people who do science should be the ones making science policy decisions. And he’s kind of got a point, except that when he says “people” he means himself, and according to the narrative he’s an egotistic nutjob. And evil.

The discussion went off and kind of started to fail to differentiate between real and fictional scientists, and I found myself pointing out that there’s a tendency to portray all scientists as incapable of making “correct” moral or political decisions. In books they’re often carried away by how awesome their work is that they don’t think of the practical applications, or they do think of practical applications that are totally wacko and EVIL and disapproved of by the narrative. (At least the biologists are. Maybe the physicists get off lightly because people are less cool with the kind of scientists who screw around with DNA. )

I felt compelled to point out that scientists are people too. They’re perfectly capable of making moral decisions and not getting blinded by how awesome their latest technique is. They’re even nice people, lots of them. They raise nice, well-adjusted kids and play in their local orchestra and have a sense of humor. Some of them read Jane Austen, for God’s sake!

So why are children’s science fiction books so often about OMG DOOM EVIL SCIENTISTS EVIL EVIL EVIL? Where are the books about how awesome their genetically engineered human-protein-producing rabbits are?

Seriously.

I kind of miss the days of Philosophy of Science class, when all you had to do was put the physics and the psychology majors in a room together, suggest that there might be no such thing as Truth, and pass the popcorn.
timeripple: (intellectual dilettante)
Orthros no Inu is over, and so are my recaps. I’ll miss the weekly woobiefest, but everybody else can heave a sigh of relief.

Last week in SFF class I found myself, once again, in the position of defending science. We had read Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH (O’Brian), Double Helix (Werlin), and The House of the Scorpion (Farmer) for that week. We got to talking about how in House of the Scorpion the evildoers are the people who use the products of science rather than the people who do the science, whereas in Double Helix the main scientist is EVIL EVIL EVIL. The main EVIL EVIL GOT IT YET? EVILLLL scientist talks about how people who do science should be the ones making science policy decisions. And he’s kind of got a point, except that when he says “people” he means himself, and according to the narrative he’s an egotistic nutjob. And evil.

The discussion went off and kind of started to fail to differentiate between real and fictional scientists, and I found myself pointing out that there’s a tendency to portray all scientists as incapable of making “correct” moral or political decisions. In books they’re often carried away by how awesome their work is that they don’t think of the practical applications, or they do think of practical applications that are totally wacko and EVIL and disapproved of by the narrative. (At least the biologists are. Maybe the physicists get off lightly because people are less cool with the kind of scientists who screw around with DNA. )

I felt compelled to point out that scientists are people too. They’re perfectly capable of making moral decisions and not getting blinded by how awesome their latest technique is. They’re even nice people, lots of them. They raise nice, well-adjusted kids and play in their local orchestra and have a sense of humor. Some of them read Jane Austen, for God’s sake!

So why are children’s science fiction books so often about OMG DOOM EVIL SCIENTISTS EVIL EVIL EVIL? Where are the books about how awesome their genetically engineered human-protein-producing rabbits are?

Seriously.

I kind of miss the days of Philosophy of Science class, when all you had to do was put the physics and the psychology majors in a room together, suggest that there might be no such thing as Truth, and pass the popcorn.
timeripple: (ryo is pensive)
Monday night was College Night at the Museum of Science, so [livejournal.com profile] cadragongirl and I went. Saw an IMAX film about the Amazon; learned that my childhood ambition has a name and that name is Medicinal Ethnobotany. Good to know! Pink Floyd: The Wall laser show kind of interesting, kind of not.

That one part of La Vie Boheme makes a lot more sense now, though.

Orthros no Inu 7: much sympathy and evenhandedness and no lame, insensitive jokes in bad taste whatsoever! )

In other news, I'm constructing a science fiction playlist to help me through my reading. It’s... pretty short. XD
timeripple: (ryo is pensive)
Monday night was College Night at the Museum of Science, so [livejournal.com profile] cadragongirl and I went. Saw an IMAX film about the Amazon; learned that my childhood ambition has a name and that name is Medicinal Ethnobotany. Good to know! Pink Floyd: The Wall laser show kind of interesting, kind of not.

That one part of La Vie Boheme makes a lot more sense now, though.

Orthros no Inu 7: much sympathy and evenhandedness and no lame, insensitive jokes in bad taste whatsoever! )

In other news, I'm constructing a science fiction playlist to help me through my reading. It’s... pretty short. XD
timeripple: (intellectual dilettante)
I had a crazy weekend in that it was the Simmons Summer Institute, with the theme of "Crimes and Misdemeanors." The class's syllabus was based on works by the speakers, so it was pretty exciting to hear them speak and meet some of them. What a weekend. I am still reeling from how much I love MT Anderson. I thought I loved him before, but damn.

This section has been cut for fangirling )

And now I'm searching frantically for books featuring a thief narrator/protagonist so I can write my paper. I've got Megan Whalen Turner's The Thief and sequels, Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus trilogy, Hilari Bell's first two Knight and Rogue books, and Celia Rees's Sovay. Any others you can think of? Children's books would be best for my paper, although I'd be interested to hear of any others you might recommend.
timeripple: (intellectual dilettante)
I had a crazy weekend in that it was the Simmons Summer Institute, with the theme of "Crimes and Misdemeanors." The class's syllabus was based on works by the speakers, so it was pretty exciting to hear them speak and meet some of them. What a weekend. I am still reeling from how much I love MT Anderson. I thought I loved him before, but damn.

This section has been cut for fangirling )

And now I'm searching frantically for books featuring a thief narrator/protagonist so I can write my paper. I've got Megan Whalen Turner's The Thief and sequels, Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus trilogy, Hilari Bell's first two Knight and Rogue books, and Celia Rees's Sovay. Any others you can think of? Children's books would be best for my paper, although I'd be interested to hear of any others you might recommend.
timeripple: (anenome)
I hate group projects. I hate trying to write things with other people. I’m not going to pretend that I’m a great writer, but I can see so clearly these days how things could be more effectively stated, how they could be more precise or make a greater emotional impact. Sigh. Being the one with the Vision is hard when you're not the one in charge.

...

As part of my mission to overanalyze everything, I got the first season of Roswell out of the library last week.

Roswell: Teaching Us All The Difference Between Plants, Animals And Aliens )

...

On to my other favorite topic! I watched the first two episodes of Strongest Chil Woo and wasn’t quite as impressed with the hilarious badness as other people have been. Maybe it loses a lot in translation, since the subs are actually rather good. Have long since given up on The Rose as hopelessly boring.

Watched the first and only subbed ep of Koishite Akuma (the drama of bad CGI vampire fang trailers), which was hilarious. Possibly unintentionally. I was only going to watch that one so I could laugh at [livejournal.com profile] snowqueenofhoth, but I might have to keep going for the hilarity. Had to stifle my laughter as I was in the library at the time. Let’s face it, vampirism will never not be a metaphor for sex. I kept snickering every time Vampire Junior felt his teeth to see if his fangs were growing in.

I've started Triple too, and it's the most adorable thing ever. Also decided to give Buzzer Beat a try, after somebody’s recap with screencaps. I think Yamapi actually cracked half an expression once or twice, although his hairstyle is still a crime against hair. I might keep watching-- I like basketball quite a lot, plus there’s a violin girl, pink basketball uniforms, and plenty of gratuitous pretty. Yay!

What are you all watching these days?
timeripple: (anenome)
I hate group projects. I hate trying to write things with other people. I’m not going to pretend that I’m a great writer, but I can see so clearly these days how things could be more effectively stated, how they could be more precise or make a greater emotional impact. Sigh. Being the one with the Vision is hard when you're not the one in charge.

...

As part of my mission to overanalyze everything, I got the first season of Roswell out of the library last week.

Roswell: Teaching Us All The Difference Between Plants, Animals And Aliens )

...

On to my other favorite topic! I watched the first two episodes of Strongest Chil Woo and wasn’t quite as impressed with the hilarious badness as other people have been. Maybe it loses a lot in translation, since the subs are actually rather good. Have long since given up on The Rose as hopelessly boring.

Watched the first and only subbed ep of Koishite Akuma (the drama of bad CGI vampire fang trailers), which was hilarious. Possibly unintentionally. I was only going to watch that one so I could laugh at [livejournal.com profile] snowqueenofhoth, but I might have to keep going for the hilarity. Had to stifle my laughter as I was in the library at the time. Let’s face it, vampirism will never not be a metaphor for sex. I kept snickering every time Vampire Junior felt his teeth to see if his fangs were growing in.

I've started Triple too, and it's the most adorable thing ever. Also decided to give Buzzer Beat a try, after somebody’s recap with screencaps. I think Yamapi actually cracked half an expression once or twice, although his hairstyle is still a crime against hair. I might keep watching-- I like basketball quite a lot, plus there’s a violin girl, pink basketball uniforms, and plenty of gratuitous pretty. Yay!

What are you all watching these days?

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